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5 Important Facts About High Blood Sugar And The Best Foods To Eat To Prevent It

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5 Important Facts About High Blood Sugar And The Best Foods To Eat To Prevent It
5 Important Facts About Blood Sugar Levels graphic © healthinfocus.net
Food images – Wikipedia lic. under CC (see foot of article for full license info)

The nitty-gritty of how a burger fuels a person for several hours after eating it is not really regarded as a “must-know” for the majority of the population. But that is something that needs to be changed: With diabetes plaguing ten percent of the American population (that’s almost 30 million people) [1], knowing how the body produces energy from food should be important to everyone – because it could ultimately be that knowledge that keeps you alive… here are 5 important facts about blood sugar levels:

1) Blood Sugar Is Actually Blood Glucose

The term “blood sugar” is often heard when talking about diabetes. The correct medical term is actual blood glucose levels – which refers to the amount of glucose found in the blood. But hold up, what’s glucose? Glucose is a simple sugar. It is a type of carbohydrate that comes from the food a person eats which is digested and absorbed by the body. Glucose is very important to the cells; in order to produce energy for life functions, glucose is absorbed by the cell, broken down, and turned into ATP, the unit of energy used by body.

2) Insulin and Glucose Work Together

While high levels of blood sugar contribute to the development of diabetes, the problem actually lies in the body’s ability to produce another substance – a hormone called insulin. When a healthy person eats too much and there is too much glucose circulating in the blood, the pancreas releases insulin. Insulin is responsible for stimulating our cells to absorb glucose, thereby lowering blood sugar levels to normal.

3) High Blood Glucose Causes Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes Type 1 is characterized by a failure of the pancreas to produce insulin. This is the only type that affects children, hence the condition’s other name, juvenile diabetes. [2]

Diabetes Type 2 is a problem that begins with insulin sensitivity. When the cells of the body are consistently exposed to high levels of glucose, the cells can become less sensitive to insulin. Think of this in a similar way to your sense of smell. People who are consistently exposed to a particular odor become less sensitive to it – like living on a farm and finding that the smell of animals is barely noticeable after several weeks.

When there is too much glucose in the blood in a diabetic person, the cells don’t respond to the normal level of insulin needed to absorb the glucose – this is decreased sensitivity, which is seen in Diabetes Type II. With too much insulin in the blood, the pancreas then produces less insulin – contributing to even higher levels of blood glucose and creating a spiral into Diabetes Type 2.

4) Some Of The Symptoms of Low Blood Sugar and High Blood Sugar Can Be Similar

Hyperglycemia has a blood glucose level greater than 110 mg/dl after fasting or greater than 140 mg/dl two hours after a meal. Hypoglycemia has a blood glucose level lower than 60 mg/dl. [2]

5) Grains And Fiber In The Diet May Help Lower Blood Glucose

The primary factors for prevention and treatment of diabetes involve a healthy diet, physical exercise, not smoking and maintaining a normal body weight. [3]

Avoidance of sweets and high-carbohydrate food is an essential part of the diabetic diet. Pastries and soda have high sugar content, which is dangerous for a diabetic person. White bread is converted rapidly to blood sugar and causes a significant spike. However, food that is high in soluble fiber like oatmeal (unsweetened!) and barley – basically food that takes longer to digest – is a better option because it does not elevate levels of blood glucose as high or as fast. [4]

Note – this article is a general knowledge report based on scientific studies and as with the rest of this site, is not medical advice. Please see full disclaimer at foot of page.

References:

[1] American Diabetes Association (2014). National Diabetes Statistics Report. http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/

[2] Smeltzer, et. al. (2010). Brunner and Suddarth’s Textbook of Medical-Surgical Nursing p.1197-1199.

[3] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabetes_mellitus

[4] Kam, K. Diabetic Diet: 6 Foods That May Help Control Blood Sugar. http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/features/diabetic-diet-6-foods-control-blood-sugar

9 Signs You May Have A Hormone Imbalance And 9 Things You Can Do About It

9 Signs You May Have A Hormone Imbalance And 9 Things You Can Do About ItImage – EatLocalGrown

Hormones are absolutely essential to our health and well-being, yet most people know very little about their functions and – importantly – how to optimize their benefits and function.

Hormones are the body’s “chemical messengers”, telling your body’s organs what to do and how much of it. The body’s various hormones are made by the endocrine glands – which include the pituitary gland, pineal gland, thymus, thyroid gland, adrenal glands, pancreas, testes (male) and ovaries (female).

Factors such as growth, the way you metabolize food, sexual function, mood, body temperature and even the way food is metabolized are all governed by hormones.

The body’s intricate mechanism is designed to keep these hormones in balance, however numerous factors in the modern world can influence and damage this subtle equilibrium. A wide range of chemicals (both synthetic and natural) are regarded to be endocrine disruptors – including pharmaceuticals, dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), DDT, other pesticides, and plasticizers such as BPA. Endocrine disruptors may be found in many everyday products – including plastic bottles, metal food cans, detergents, flame retardants, toys, cosmetics, pesticides… and even food.

Fortunately there is much you can do. We’ve selected two superb tutorials that will help your knowledge on this important health topic:

Here’s the tutorial listing 9 Likely Signs That You Have A Hormone Imbalance:
http://eatlocalgrown.com/article/12410-9-likely-signs-you-have-a-hormone-imbalance.html?c=aan

And here’s the tutorial listing 9 Natural Methods For Balancing Hormones:
http://wellnessmama.com/5425/balance-hormones/

Further Reading: Dr Young: Roundup Herbicide Is An Endocrine Disruptor in Human Cells at Drinking Water Levels



I Can't Help Showing This Off:

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I already tried it myself and let me tell... you I was completely blown away... His surprising tactics could make your life easier and give you the peace of mind you deserve.

Don't just take my word for it... watch his short video and decide for yourself.

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The #1 Muscle That Eliminates Joint And Back Pain, Anxiety And Looking Fat

By Mike Westerdal CPT

Can you guess which muscle in your body is the #1 muscle that eliminates joint and back pain, anxiety and looking fat?

This is especially important if you spend a significant amount of time sitting every day (I do, and this really affects me in a big way!)

Working this "hidden survival muscle" that most people are simply not training because no-one ever taught them how will boost your body shape, energy levels, immune system, sexual function, strength and athletic performance when unlocked.

If this "hidden" most powerful primal muscle is healthy, we are healthy.

Is it...

a) Abs

b) Chest

c) Glutes

d) Hip Flexors

Take the quiz above and see if you got the correct answer!

P.S. Make sure you check out this page to get to know the 10 simple moves that will bring vitality back into your life:

==> Click here to discover which "hidden survival muscle" will help you boost your energy levels, immune system, sexual function, strength and athletic performance permanently!


Everyone knows green smoothies are healthy, right? However…

Have you heard of a “red” smoothie? If not, check out this story…
The Red Smoothie Detox Factor
=> “Red” Smoothie Helps Alabama Girl Shed 80lbs!



  1. Famous Chef Sheds 60lbs Researching New Paleo Recipes: Get The Cookbook FREE Here
  2. #1 muscle that eliminates joint and back pain, anxiety and looking fat
  3. "Red" Smoothie Helps Alabama Girl Shed 80lbs!
  4. [PROOF] Reverse Diabetes with a “Pancreas Jumpstart”
  5. 7 odd foods that KILL your abdominal fat (surprising fat-fighters)
  6. Here's What Happens When You "Unlock Your Hip Flexors"
  7. The #1 WORST food that CAUSES Faster Aging  (beware -- Are you eating this?)





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Heart Attack vs. Cardiac Arrest – Do You Know The Difference?

Heart Attack vs. Cardiac Arrest
Infographic © naturalhealthzone.org. Image sources: see foot of page

Since the advent of the internet and Google, most people deem themselves medical experts. From a mild flu to a more serious chronic disease like Kawasaki’s Disease, a quick tap-tap-tap on your keyboard and you have years’ worth of research at your fingertips. While the availability of information on the internet has brought a lot of good to the world, much of this kind of knowledge sadly needs to be taken with a grain of salt – especially if you aren’t in a medical profession or study a medical degree.



One of the more common “uneducated” mistakes people make is this: Thinking heart attack and cardiac arrest are the same.

While you will often hear these words together (often mistakenly in exchange for the other), they are two very different things. Heart attack can cause cardiac arrest. That means that a heart attack is a precedent event and a cardiac arrest is the result. These two terms belong in a causational relationship; they do not equal the other.

Heart attack = myocardial infarction

The correct medical term for a heart attack is a myocardial infarction or MI. An MI happens when the blood (and therefore the oxygen) supply to the cardiac muscle (called the “myocardium”) is suddenly cut off. This is usually caused by a blockage of fatty deposits called plaque or a sudden bleed. Poor diet and exercise can cause a buildup of fat and cells in the blood vessels that supply the heart with blood. When the blockage becomes too big, it can cause a bleed; the same way a bleed can happen if blood pressure becomes too high and ruptures these delicate blood vessels.

Myocardial infarction –> cardiac arrest

Sudden cardiac arrest or SCA is an event wherein the heart stops beating completely. A person who has experienced an SCA has no palpable pulse and is unresponsive. They may be breathing abnormally or not at all. The start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation or CPR and advanced life support (if the SCA occurred in a hospital or a medical set up) are needed in this scenario. MIs do not always lead to cardiac arrest, but the statistics are high enough to warrant immediate medical attention once the warning signs and symptoms of a heart attack are felt. With more than half a million SCAs in 2013 (and roughly 350,000 of those outside of a hospital), it pays to be vigilant. You need to watch out for these signs and symptoms if you have a preexisting cardiac condition (or even if you have never been diagnosed with any sort of health problem): – Chest discomfort. The key word here is discomfort. Don’t wait for 10 out of 10 on the pain scale before you visit your doctor. If you start feeling pressure or twinges in or around your chest area, be sure to seek medical attention. – Shortness of breath. When you feel like catching your breath even after mild physical activity like walking up a flight of stairs or taking a short walk in the park, you may have a mild heart condition. – Other typical signs and symptoms include cold sweats, nausea, and lightheadedness.

Fight your risk for heart disease.

We may blame our genes for bad skin and hair, short(er) height that we might like, and predilection for various diseases, but when it comes to heart disease, our own lifestyle choices play a very big role. What we eat, what kind of (or lack thereof) exercise we do, and what hobbies we like to partake in all contribute to our risk for a heart condition.

– Keep the salt and fat at a minimum. Food that is salted and deep-fried should be avoided if you want to keep your blood vessels plaque-free.

– Engage in mild to moderate exercise at least three times a week for thirty minutes; that involves jogging,walking, or cycling – take your pick.

– Eat a lot of vegetables and fruit. Veggies and fruits have a lot of vitamins and minerals that boost our immune system and improve our body’s natural balance.

– Don’t smoke; and drink in moderation. Smoking – specifically the tar and nicotine in cigarettes – damage our blood vessels, making them prone to plaque deposition and subsequent rupture. Drinking alcohol damages our liver and causes toxins to build up in the blood, which can damage the heart.

References:

[1] American Heart Association. Warning Signs of a Heart Attack. http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HeartAttack/WarningSignsofaHeartAttack/Warning-Signs-of-a-Heart-Attack_UCM_002039_Article.jsp#.VqDlUCp97IV

[2] American Heart Association. Cardiac Arrest Statistics. http://cpr.heart.org/AHAECC/CPRAndECC/General/UCM_477263_Cardiac-Arrest-Statistics.jsp

[3] Lavie, C., O’Keefe, J. & Sallis, R. (2015). Exercise and the heart–the harm of too little and too much. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25757005

[4] Folson, A., et. al. (2015). American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7: Avoiding Heart Failure and Preserving Cardiac Structure and Function. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25908393

[5] Ahmed, A., et. al. (2015). Risk of Heart Failure and Death After Prolonged Smoking Cessation: Role of Amount and Duration of Prior Smoking. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26038535